Tubulin Alpha antibody | YOL1/34

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Rat anti Tubulin Alpha

Product Type
Monoclonal Antibody
Clone
YOL1/34
Isotype
IgG2a
Product CodeApplicationsDatasheetMSDSPack SizeList PriceQuantity
MCA78G C E IF R WB 0.5 mg
Rat anti Tubulin alpha antibody, clone YOL1/34 recognizes the alpha subunit of tubulin. The reactivity pattern is similar to that seen with clone YL1/2.

Rat anti Tubulin alpha antibody, clone YOL1/34 is routinely tested in ELISA on Tubulin.

Product Details

Target Species
Yeast
Species Cross-Reactivity
Target SpeciesCross Reactivity
Birds Expected from Sequence
Mammals Expected from Sequence
Drosophila
Fungal Expected from Sequence
Human
Arabidopsis
Saccharomyces
Platyzoma
Ashbya
Mouse
Naegleria
Asplenium nidus
Seagrass (Cymodocea nodosa)
N.B. Antibody reactivity and working conditions may vary between species.
Product Form
Purified IgG - liquid
Preparation
Purified IgG prepared by affinity chromatography on Protein G from tissue culture supernatant.
Buffer Solution
Phosphate buffered saline
Preservative Stabilisers
0.09%Sodium Azide
Carrier Free
Yes
Immunogen
Yeast tubulin.
Approx. Protein Concentrations
IgG concentration 1.0mg/ml
Fusion Partners
Spleen cells from immunized LOU rats were fuzed with cells of the rat YB2/0 myeloma cell line.

Storage Information

Storage
Store at +4oC or at -20oC if preferred.

This product should be stored undiluted.

Storage in frost free freezers is not recommended. Avoid repeated freezing and thawing as this may denature the antibody. Should this product contain a precipitate we recommend microcentrifugation before use.
Shelf Life
18 months from date of despatch.

More Information

Regulatory
For research purposes only

Applications of Tubulin Alpha antibody

This product has been reported to work in the following applications. This information is derived from testing within our laboratories, peer-reviewed publications or personal communications from the originators. Please refer to references indicated for further information. For general protocol recommendations, please visit the antibody protocols page.
Application Name Verified Min Dilution Max Dilution
ELISA 10ug/ml as detecting antibody
Immunofluorescence
Immunohistology - Frozen
Radioimmunoassays
Western Blotting
Where this product has not been tested for use in a particular technique this does not necessarily exclude its use in such procedures. Suggested working dilutions are given as a guide only. It is recommended that the user titrates the product for use in their own system using appropriate negative/positive controls.

Secondary Antibodies Available

Description Product Code Pack Size Applications List Price Quantity
Goat anti Rat IgG:Alk. Phos. (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR131A 1 ml C E P WB
Goat anti Rat IgG:Biotin (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR131B 0.5 mg C E IF P WB
Rabbit F(ab')2 anti Rat IgG:Dylight®800 STAR16D800GA 0.1 mg F IF WB
Rabbit F(ab')2 anti Rat IgG:FITC STAR17B 1 mg F
Rabbit F(ab')2 anti Rat IgG:HRP STAR21B 1 mg C E P RE
Goat F(ab')2 anti Rat IgG:FITC (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR69 0.5 ml F
Goat anti Rat IgG:DyLight®549 (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR71D549GA 0.1 mg F IF
Goat anti Rat IgG:DyLight®649 (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR71D649GA 0.1 mg F IF
Goat anti Rat IgG:Dylight®800 (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR71D800GA 0.1 mg F IF WB
Goat anti Rat IgG:HRP (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR72 0.5 mg C E P
Goat F(ab')2 anti Rat IgG:RPE (Mouse Adsorbed) STAR73 0.5 ml F

Application Based External Images

Immunofluorescence

Western Blotting

Product Specific References

References for Tubulin Alpha antibody

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    J Cell Biol. 93 (3): 576-82.
  2. Waples, W.G. et al. (2009) Putting the brake on FEAR: Tof2 promotes the biphasic release of Cdc14 phosphatase during mitotic exit.
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  3. White, J. et al. (2005) Developmental activation of the Rb-E2F pathway and establishment of cell cycle-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase activity during embryonic stem cell differentiation.
    Mol Biol Cell. 16 (4): 2018-27.
  4. Lang, C. et al. (2010) Structural mutants of the spindle pole body cause distinct alteration of cytoplasmic microtubules and nuclear dynamics in multinucleated hyphae.
    Mol Biol Cell. 21 (5): 753-66.
  5. Hao, N. et al. (2011) Identification of residues in the N-terminal PAS domains important for dimerization of Arnt and AhR.
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  6. D'Ambrosio, C. et al. (2008) Identification of cis-acting sites for condensin loading onto budding yeast chromosomes.
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  7. Hartl, T.A. et al. (2008) Condensin II resolves chromosomal associations to enable anaphase I segregation in Drosophila male meiosis.
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  8. Mirchenko, L. and Uhlmann, F. (2010) Sli15(INCENP) dephosphorylation prevents mitotic checkpoint reengagement due to loss of tension at anaphase onset.
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  9. Sullivan, M. et al. (2001) Orchestrating anaphase and mitotic exit: separase cleavage and localization of Slk19.
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  10. Sullivan, M. et al. (2008) Cyclin-specific control of ribosomal DNA segregation.
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  11. Yu, H.G. et al. (2007) The Aurora kinase Ipl1 maintains the centromeric localization of PP2A to protect cohesin during meiosis.
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  12. Rossio, V. and Yoshida, S. (2011) Spatial regulation of Cdc55-PP2A by Zds1/Zds2 controls mitotic entry and mitotic exit in budding yeast.
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  13. Grava, S. et al. (2011) Clustering of Nuclei in Multinucleated Hyphae Is Prevented by Dynein-Driven Bidirectional Nuclear Movements and Microtubule Growth Control in Ashbya gossypii.
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  14. Raspelli, E. et al. (2011) Budding yeast Dma1 and Dma2 participate in regulation of Swe1 levels and localization.
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  15. Finlayson, M.R. et al. (2011) Regulation of exit from mitosis in multinucleate Ashbya gossypii cells relies on a minimal network of genes.
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  16. Chatzimeletiou, K. et al. (2005) Spindle abnormalities in normally developing and arrested human preimplantation embryos in vitro identified by confocal laser scanning microscopy.
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  17. Chatzimeletiou, K. et al. (2012) Cytoskeletal analysis of human blastocysts by confocal laser scanning microscopy following vitrification.
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  18. Keeling, J.W. and Miller, R.K. (2011) Indirect immunofluorescence for monitoring spindle assembly and disassembly in yeast.
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  19. Elhanany-Tamir, H. et al. (2012) Organelle positioning in muscles requires cooperation between two KASH proteins and microtubules.
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  20. Walsh, C.J. (2012) The structure of the mitotic spindle and nucleolus during mitosis in the amebo-flagellate Naegleria.
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  21. Adamakis, I.D. et al. (2013) Effects of bisphenol A on the microtubule arrays in root meristematic cells of Pisum sativum L.
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  22. Buerstenbinder, K. et al. (2013) Arabidopsis Calmodulin-binding IQD1 Localizes to Microtubules and Interacts with Kinesin Light Chain-Related Protein-1.
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  23. Panteris, E. et al. (2013) The distribution of TPX2 in dividing leaf cells of the fern Asplenium nidus.
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  24. Malea, P. et al. (2013) Microtubule integrity and cell viability under metal (Cu, Ni and Cr) stress in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa.
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  25. Eleftheriou, E.P. et al. (2016) Hexavalent chromium-induced differential disruption of cortical microtubules in some Fabaceae species is correlated with acetylation of α-tubulin.
    Protoplasma. 253 (2): 531-42.
  26. Wang, S. et al. (2015) Nesprin provides elastic properties to muscle nuclei by cooperating with spectraplakin and EB1.
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  27. Okamoto, M. et al. (2016) Fyn Accelerates M Phase Progression by Promoting the Assembly of Mitotic Spindle Microtubules.
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  28. Eleftheriou, E.P. et al. (2015) Aberration of mitosis by hexavalent chromium in some Fabaceae members is mediated by species-specific microtubule disruption.
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  29. Sullivan, A.E. et al. (2016) MAGED1 is a novel regulator of a select subset of bHLH PAS transcription factors.
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  30. Schweizer, N. et al. (2015) An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.
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  31. Livanos P et al. (2016) Deliberate ROS production and auxin synergistically trigger the asymmetrical division generating the subsidiary cells in Zea mays stomatal complexes.
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  32. Xie, J.L. et al. (2017) Staurosporine Induces Filamentation in the Human Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans via Signaling through Cyr1 and Protein Kinase A.
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  34. Kowanda, M. et al. (2016) Loss of function of the Drosophila Ninein-related centrosomal protein Bsg25D causes mitotic defects and impairs embryonic development.
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  35. Diao, L.T. et al. (2017) Delineation of the role of chromatin assembly and the Rtt101Mms1 E3 ubiquitin ligase in DNA damage checkpoint recovery in budding yeast.
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