FGF Basic

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Recombinant Human FGF Basic

Product Type
Recombinant Protein
Product CodeApplicationsDatasheetMSDSPack SizeList PriceQuantity
PHP105 E FN WB 50 µg
Recombinant Human FGF basic represents the C-terminal protion of human fibroblast growth factor 2 (A135 - S288).

Fibroblast growth factor basic (FGF basic), also known as FGF 2, is a heparin binding growth factor which has stimulatory activity on a range of cells of mesenchymal, neuroectodermal and endothelial origin.
Note: FGF basic is sensitive to acidic conditions.

Product Details

Target Species
Human
Product Form
Purified recombinant protein expressed in E. coli - lyophilised
Reconstitution
Reconstitute with 0.5ml Tris (5mM, pH7.6).
Care should be taken during reconstitution as the protein may appear as a film at the bottom of the vial. Bio-Rad recommend that the vial is gently mixed after reconstitution. Further dilutions may be prepared in a buffer containing a carrier protein (eg 0.1% BSA).
Buffer Solution
TRIS buffered saline.
Preservative Stabilisers
None present
Activity
2 x 106 units/mg
Purity
>95% by SDS PAGE and HPLC analysis
Approx. Protein Concentrations
Total protein concentration 0.1 mg/ml after reconstitution.
Protein Molecular Weight
17.2kD (154 amino acid sequence)
Endotoxin Level
<0.1ng/ug

Storage Information

Storage
Prior to reconstitution store at +4oC. Following reconstitution store at -20oC.

This product should be stored undiluted.

Storage in frost-free freezers is not recommended. Avoid repeated freezing and thawing as this may denature the protein. Should this product contain a precipitate we recommend microcentrifugation before use.
Shelf Life
3 months from date of reconstitution.

More Information

UniProt
P09038 Related reagents
Entrez Gene
FGF2 Related reagents
Regulatory
For research purposes only

Applications of FGF Basic

This product has been reported to work in the following applications. This information is derived from testing within our laboratories, peer-reviewed publications or personal communications from the originators. Please refer to references indicated for further information. For general protocol recommendations, please visit the antibody protocols page.
Application Name Verified Min Dilution Max Dilution
ELISA 0.2 0.4 ng/well
Functional Assays 0.1 10 ng/ml
Western Blotting 1.5 3.0 ng/lane
Where this protein has not been tested for use in a particular technique this does not necessarily exclude its use in such procedures. Suggested working dilutions are given as a guide only. It is recommended that the user titrates the protein for use in their own system using appropriate negative/positive controls.
ELISA
This product may be used as a standard for ELISA applications with either AHP1038 or AHP1038B.
Western Blotting
This product may be used as the positive control for Wester Blot applications with either AHP1038 or AHP1038B.

Product Specific References

References for FGF Basic

  1. Svendsen, C.N. et al. (1997) Long-term survival of human central nervous system progenitor cells transplanted into a rat model of Parkinson's disease.
    Exp Neurol. 148: 135-46.
  2. Kim, T.H. et al. (2005) Recombinant human prothrombin kringle-2 induces bovine capillary endothelial cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 phase through inhibition of cyclin D1/CDK4 complex: modulation of reactive oxygen species generation and up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.
    Angiogenesis. 8: 307-14.
  3. van Beuningen, HM et al. (2014) Inhibition of TAK1 and/or JAK can rescue impaired chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis-like conditions.
    Tissue Eng Part A. 20 (15-16): 2243-52.
  4. Pleumeekers, M.M. et al. (2014) The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage.
    Eur Cell Mater. 27: 264-80.
  5. Willems, N. et al. (2015) Intradiscal application of rhBMP-7 does not induce regeneration in a canine model of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration.
    Arthritis Res Ther. 17: 137.
  6. Pleumeekers, M.M. et al. (2015) Cartilage regeneration in the head and neck area: Combination of ear or nasal chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage production: Cell combinations for cartilage production.
    Plast Reconstr Surg. Aug 10. [Epub ahead of print]
  7. Dimitrellos, V. et al. (2003) Capillary electrophoresis and enzyme solid phase assay for examining the purity of a synthetic heparin proteoglycan-like conjugate and identifying binding to basic fibroblast growth factor.
    Biomed Chromatogr. 17 (1): 42-7.
  8. Narcisi R et al. (2015) Long-term expansion, enhanced chondrogenic potential, and suppression of endochondral ossification of adult human MSCs via WNT signaling modulation.
    Stem Cell Reports. 4 (3): 459-72.
  9. Lolli A et al. (2016) Silencing of anti-chondrogenic microRNA-221 in human mesenchymal stem cells promotes cartilage repair in vivo.
    Stem Cells. Mar 1. [Epub ahead of print]
  10. de Kroon, L. M. G. et al. (2016) Activin and Nodal Are Not Suitable Alternatives to TGF  for Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells
    Cartilage. Sep 7 [Epub ahead of print]
  11. Cleary, M.A. et al. (2016) Expression of CD105 on expanded mesenchymal stem cells does not predict their chondrogenic potential.
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 24 (5): 868-72.
  12. Grotenhuis, N. et al. (2016) Biomaterials Influence Macrophage-Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction In Vitro.
    Tissue Eng Part A. 22 (17-18): 1098-107.
  13. Rodrigues, A.I. et al. (2017) Calcium phosphates and silicon: exploring methods of incorporation.
    Biomater Res. 21: 6.
  14. Le, B.Q. et al. (2015) High-Throughput Screening Assay for the Identification of Compounds Enhancing Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Production by ATDC5 Cells.
    Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 21 (7): 726-36.
  15. Le, B.Q. et al. (2017) An Approach to In Vitro Manufacturing of Hypertrophic Cartilage Matrix for Bone Repair.
    Bioengineering (Basel). 4 (2)Apr 20 [Epub ahead of print].
  16. Bach, F.C. et al. (2017) Link-N: The missing link towards intervertebral disc repair is species-specific.
    PLoS One. 12 (11): e0187831.
  17. Pleumeekers, M.M. et al. (2018) Trophic effects of adipose-tissue-derived and bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhance cartilage generation by chondrocytes in co-culture.
    PLoS One. 13 (2): e0190744.